Modified interlock protocol for authentication

Of the many difficult problems dealing with public key cryptography, there are few so hard to crack as public key authentication. Public keys are easy to obtain (that’s why they are “public”), and because of this, it is hard to be sure that a certain key belongs to a certain person, what is known as authentication. Usually it is recommended that the key be handed out in person or that it be identified (directly or through a one-way hash) by a rich communication medium such as voice or video.

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Lessons from the VIC cipher

abelIn the mid-1950’s, the Soviet spy Reino Hayhanen, codenamed VIC, and his handler Rudolph Abel (in the picture) pulled off an incredible feat: they utilized a paper-and-pencil cipher that not even the FBI (the NSA wasn’t operating within US borders back then) was able to crack until Hayhanen defected and explained its inner workings. Computers already existed, and they were used primarily to crack ciphers like VIC. In this article, I go over some of its features, and how they can be used to enhance other simple ciphers. Read More

Remember strong passwords with this keyboard trick

keyboardEveryone knows that real people suck at coming up with strong passwords. They are either easy to remember and laughably weak, or decently strong and impossible
to recall. On top of that, it is highly recommended to use different passwords for different sites, so that compromising one won’t compromise the others. In this article, I follow Nobel laureate Manuel Blum’s recommendation of using not a password, but an easy to remember algorithm to come up with a way to generate strong, specific passwords for each site, and be able to remember them all.

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Is self-destruct email possible?

Earlier this week, my new app SeeOnce was rejected (hopefully only temporarily) by the iOS app store for allegedly misleading users into thinking that it could make self-destructing messages. Leaving aside what exactly “self-destruct” means for a digital message and whether or not SeeOnce actually achieves this, a number of current and past apps have claimed precisely this. In this article, companion to the one on Privnote vs. SeeOnce, I go over these apps, how they work, and how they can be used most profitably. Read More

The case for symmetric encryption

In this day and age, everything dealing with encryption seems to be of the more complex asymmetric kind: PGP, SSL, TLS, BlockChain, you name it. So, is the old-fashioned symmetric encryption, where the same key is used to encrypt and decrypt, obsolete and done with? “By no means!” say a number of users. In this article, I begin quoting an email I got recently, adding some of my own musings, and making an announcement after that.

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Which end-to-end encrypted email is best?

After the 2013 Snowden revelations, there has been a push to make email more private than it currently is (which is, essentially, like writing on a postcard). The big guns, Google and Yahoo, have wowed to make their respective email systems end-to-end  (E2E) encrypted but progress has been slow. The official page about the Google effort has not been updated for months (as of June 2015). In this article, I go over some options available today, while we wait for that final solution that, at this pace, might still take a while to come.

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PassLok for Email enters beta

logo v2-440x280 emailJohnny can’t encrypt. It’s no use. . . . This is what has been said repeatedly about mere mortal users and encryption, which forever has been the domain of black chambers and mathematical geniuses. Scores of companies have tried to get around this problem by hiding encryption in their servers, far away from users’ eyes.

And yet, studies have shown that this creates another problem: if I can’t see any of the encryption, how can I relax and be sure that this message where I’m risking my career, maybe my life, is truly away from prying eyes? Just because the software tells me to relax?

PassLok does not hide encryption from users, and it tries hard to make it accessible. This is why the next step in its development is so important. PassLok for Email is a new Chrome extension that adds PassLok encryption to regular web-based email apps. Its beta, which supports Gmail, Yahoo, and Outlook online, has just been released for public testing. Read More